Jeep Patriot 4×4 ABS Light, Rear Hub & Bearing Replacement
Jeep Patriot 4×4 ABS Light, Rear Hub & Bearing Replacement


Hi viewers, in this video, I will show you how my brother and I, replaced the rear hub bearing assembly on his Jeep Patriot 2010. During the winter, the ABS light and the traction control light were turning on once in a while, but, lately these lights were always turned on. The first step was to connect the scanner and look for any OBD2 codes related to the ABS system. I found only one code, the C1043, it refers to the rear left wheel. We went for road test and I got more information using the live data mode. I selected the two rear wheel speed readings to compare the left and the right sensors. Looking at the graphic displays, it was obvious that there was a bad sensor signal every time the left tire was hitting a bump on the street. Back in my garage, the Jeep Patriot was lifted and secured with a jack stand. For more safety, we also blocked the opposite wheels. Refer to ”jacking and tire changing” in your owner manual for procedures to follow. The wheel was removed to make it easier to go under the vehicle and to carry out a visual inspection. When I was behind the hub assembly, I touched the wheel speed sensor with a screwdriver and it was obvious that the sensor retainer was completely destroyed by the rust. There was only one choice, the hub & bearing assembly had to be replaced. To be able to remove the rotor, we began by moving the caliper. A small bungee cord was used to safely hold the caliper. The handbrake was released to be able to remove the rotor. We were lucky, the rotor was easy to remove. When we performed that kind of job, we must take the time to examine how the parts are installed and to find out the way to work. The cotter pin, the nut retainer and the wave washer were removed to be able to unscrew the axle nut. The bit of cleaning is always good. We used an impact tool to unscrew the axle nut. If you don’t have that tool you can use a pry bar and a cheater bar as shown. The shaft was loosened and the washer was removed. Under the vehicle, behind the hub & bearing assembly the sensor was disconnected. We tried the ratchet and the impact tool to unscrew the 4 bolts. Nothing worked, they were completely frozen. We decided to go for Plan B, that is, using the propane torch to heat up the four bolts from the brake side. It meant that we had to remove the parking brake components. We began by disconnecting the 2 upper retaining springs to loosen the brake shoes. When the parking brake shoes were spread out, the hold-down spring pins were unlocked by depressing and turning them 90 degrees with a flat head screwdriver. With the spring pins removed, all the parts were easily handled. The shoe stopper plate and the parking strut assembly were also removed. We paid attention on how the lower spring was holding the adjuster in place. The parking brake cable spring was retracted and the parking brake lever was unhooked. To be more efficient the backing support plate section had to be cleaned before we began to heat up around the bolts. It was very easy to unscrew them. For safety, never touch hot bolts without heat protection. The caliper bracket was removed to make it easier to hit the hub from behind. The shop hammer and the sledgehammer were used together to be more efficient. The shaft was pushed in to free the assemblies. Even removed the parts were still frozen together. I sprayed some penetrating oil. Jack stands and other tools can be used to support the parts when we have to hit hard with a shop hammer. We gave a good beating on the hub assembly and also on the bolts, and finally it worked. We took the time to brush and sand the parts to make sure that it would be ready for reassembling. A coat of anti-seize was applied on the mating surfaces to reduce the seizing problems in the future. The shaft was also brushed to improve the installation. The four retaining bolts for the hub & bearing assembly were also cleaned. As soon as we got the new hub assembly it was put in place and the four bolts were installed. The torque was set to 77 foot-pounds. Before reconnecting the wheel speed sensor, I cleaned it to be properly installed. I tried to connect it with my fingers, but it was too difficult. I use my long nose pliers, and it was very easy to connect. Since the caliper bracket was removed, we took the opportunity to brush it and clean it. We also applied the coat of brake lubricant to slow down the rust process. After, the caliper clipping shims were cleaned and reinstalled. When the parts were brushed, they were gathered together for reassembling. First, the parking brake cable was hooked up with the brake lever. The brake shoe position was also checked. A coat of brake lubricant was applied on the backing plate contact points. Before installing the hold-on spring pins, we took the time to locate and examine the keyholes. To lock a spring pin in place, it must be depressed in the keyhole, then rotated 90 degrees and released. For the spring pins installation, the brake shoes were spaced out in the upper section. This allowed us to see the keyholes and ease the installation of the spring pins. When the brake shoes were held in place the adjuster was installed and the lower spring was attached. After that the brake shoe strut assembly was positioned between the brake shoes. The brake shoe stopper plate was put in place before the upper spring installation. The upper forward spring was attached first with the pliers. And, the last spring was attached using the pliers and a flat head screwdriver. The spring pins were rechecked and the rotor was finally installed. The adjuster did not need any adjustment at that moment because the parking brake was working fine. The rotor was held with two nuts until the brake pads were installed. When it was time to install the caliper assembly, It was easier to insert the upper caliper guide pin in the caliper bracket when the parts were loose. The caliper bracket and the bolts were reinstalled. The torque was set to 56 foot-pounds, based on a torque test that was done on the other caliper bracket. The lower caliper guide pin was inserted and the torque was set to 32 foot-pounds. When the two pads were in place the two nuts were removed. The wheel was reinstalled with the five lug nuts. The jack stand and the jack were removed. The torque for the five lug nuts was set to 100 foot-pounds. With the parking brake on, the washer and the axle nut were installed. The torque was set to 181 foot-pounds. After the nut retainer, the wave washer and the cotter pin were reinstalled. The wheel stoppers were removed and the brake pedal was depressed to bed-in the brake pads before moving the vehicle. After 15 seconds of road test the ABS and traction control lights warnings disappeared. In conclusion, be advised that if you have the first generation of 4×4 Jeep Patriot or Compass and you live up north, there is a good chance that the speed sensor retainer on the rear hub assembly may break after 7 or 9 years. I saw the same problem on a Mitsubishi Outlander 2010.

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